Inter-American Commission on Human Rights- Action required to protect journalist in Mexico!

 

Journalist need protection!

Journalist need protection!

The Special Rapporteur for Freedom of Expression of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) expressed his “deep concern” about the disappearance in Mexico of two employees of the newspaper “El Financiero”, and recent attacks on two newspapers in Coahuila and Veracruz.

The Rapporteur reported in a statement that the inspector of the newspaper “El Financiero”, Osvaldo García Iñiguez, and the driver, Jose de Jesus Ortiz Parra, disappeared on 14 November when they moved from Zacatecas to Jalisco (center-east) in a vehicle identified with company logos.

According to the last communication they had with the newspaper’s management, Garcia and Ortiz had reported that they were followed by two police vehicles.

After finding that they had reached their destination, “El Financiero” reported the disappearance of his two employees for what various police forces deployed Zacatecas intense operations and, according to the Commission, may stop some people who had information about it.

The Office also reported the attack against “El Siglo de Torreon” in Coahuila on 15 November, in which at least three people torched a car in front of the building daily and fired over 20 rounds, no injuries were reported.

Finally, reported another attack in which at least 10 masked men entered the early morning of November 6th in the newspaper “El Buen Tono” of Veracruz and set fire to the building, which escaped the 20 employees who were inside.

While acknowledging the efforts made by the authorities, the Special Rapporteur urges the Mexican government “to continue the activities aimed at the development of both people alive, to investigate exhaustively the latest statements made by them and not discard any hypothesis.”

Similarly, it was “urgent need to identify and prosecute those responsible for attacks against” The Century Tower “and” El Buen Tono “to prevent impunity and repetition of the facts.”

He also recalled the content of “Special Report on Freedom of Expression in Mexico 2010,” in which the body of the Commission reiterates the need to promote measures that effectively protect journalists and efficient mechanisms to address problems identified in research and administration of justice for these crimes.

In this regard, he urged the strengthening of the Special Prosecutor for Attention to Crimes Against Freedom of Expression and transfer to the federal courts of investigations of crimes against journalists in cases that require it. JGM

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Anonymous group canceles -Threat against Los Zetas!

We are sorry, say Anonymous

We are sorry, say Anonymous

Anonymous group canceled announced reprisals against the Zetas cartel for being a very risky operation, and was informed through a press and social networks for different users.

After disappearance of one of its members in Veracruz, one of the members announced reprisals against the drug cartelLos Zetas” with “Operation Cartel.”

However, because of the great risks involved in leaking information and to safeguard the integrity of persons adhering to the collective group of hackers decided to cancel the whole operation.

“Destroying # OpCartel because the lives of people who are not participating n can be at risk,” was published in the first text of the cancellation of the transaction, through Twitter account @ Sm0k34n0n.

Before this action the company and strategic intelligence analysis, Stratfor published an article about the “serious risk” involving actions of leakage of information about members of Los Zetas.

“Last October 6 Anonymous posted that they would inform on those who are members of Los Zetas” if Anonymous carries out its threat, it will almost certainly lead to death of the persons named as members of the cartel, whether or not the information published is accurate, “says the article by Stratfor.

In an interview with MILLENNIUM, two members of Anonymous, and Skill3r GlynissParoubek be contacted to explain the circumstances:

Why it was decided to cancel the operation “

We can not be reckless administrators to condemn to death those who participate, we have talked and discussed extensively by all and it was decided to remove it.

So why throw threats, “It’s very easy to make a video on behalf of Anonymous and launch air threats, but to think, plan and evaluate the pros and cons is another story,” they said.

What’s next ” “They continue other operations, but for now we hope to make clear that the cartel operation is false.”

Anonymous released a statement which is bounded on pages published names of officials involved in the cartel Los Zetas.

“Dear followers and supporters of this page (Anonymous). I hereby disclaims Mexico Anonymous entirely the responsibility of the news of hacking a page that is linked to alleged cartel zest”, is detailed in the text that circulated .

“Our struggle is not of this type and our ideals do not go with that operation. The note published by several electronic media is completely false. We ask for your support to spread this news,” concludes denying other media that published the page.

Finally hacktivists expressed what their official media to avoid rumors speaking:

Carlos “The Bam Bam” Pitalua local chief of Zetas cartel arrested! Veracruz!

veracruz mexico

veracruz mexico

The Mexican navy said Wednesday it had arrested the alleged local chief of the Zetas drug cartel in the Gulf coast port of Veracruz, and said he is tied to the dumping of eight bodies in a rural town a week ago.

The navy said Carlos “The Bam Bam” Pitalua and five other men were arrested on Tuesday. One of the five is suspected in helping break 32 inmates out of three Veracruz prisons in a well-planned, simultaneous escape.

One day after the jail break, gunmen dumped 35 bodies on a busy avenue of Veracruz last month. Some of the victims were reported at the time to have been escaped inmates.

And in central Mexico State, outside Mexico City, prosecutors announced Wednesday they had arrested Adrian Ramirez, alias “The Mushroom,” the alleged leader of the Cartel del Centro.

The gang is believed to be one of the spin-off groups from the Beltran Leyva cartel, which has been decimated by the arrests or deaths of its leaders.

Mexico state Attorney General Alfredo Castillo said the Cartel del Centro has been linked to at least 26 killings, and operated mainly in Mexico City suburbs.

The suspects were arrested last week, Castillo said.

Mexico’s National Public Safety System announced that almost one-third of 63,436 low-ranking Mexican police officers tested so far have failed background and security checks.

Almost one-quarter of the police chiefs and top commanders tested so far have also failed, as had about 10 percent of midlevel police commanders and officers. The agency said in a statement that all those who fail the vetting process should be fired, but left open the possibility that some might be reassigned.

Mexico has set a goal of vetting all of its police officers by the end of 2012. However, only 71,079 have been tested so far, equal to about 18 percent of the total police force of 431,739 officers.

Who is behind the killings of Zetas?

Who is this Man?

Who is this Man?

Who is behind the killings of Zetas — another drug gang or agents acting on behalf of the government or military? An ad hoc group whose presence is being tolerated by authorities as well as the public?

Coastal Veracruz, the gateway to Mexico for centuries of immigrants from Europe and beyond, a laid-back beachfront vacation spot for legions of Mexicans, has in recent months become the latest state to be thoroughly sucked into the deadly and devastating drug war.

On Sept. 20, nearly three dozen half-naked bodies were dumped in broad daylight on a busy highway underpass in a well-to-do tourist area of the city of Veracruz. Fourteen more turned up a few days later — during a convention of the nation’s top state and federal prosecutors. Then, on Oct. 6, barely 48 hours after announcing a major security offensive, military and police found an additional 36 bodies, and 10 more turned up the following day.

In videotaped presentations, a group of masked men with military bearing has claimed responsibility for the spate of killings, portraying it as a cleansing operation. Many of the bodies had a “Z” for Zeta written on the back with ink marker, a witness said.

The mystery group announced that it was in Veracruz State as “the armed branch of the people, and for the people.”

“We are asking officials and authorities who support the Zetas to stop doing so, and let the armed forces know that our only objective is to finish the Zetas,” the spokesman for the group told the camera. “We are anonymous warriors, without faces, proudly Mexican.”

For years with the Zetas tightly in charge, and the public terrified into submission, the state had stayed relatively calm. But months ago, traffickers associated with top drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman are believed to have moved in from the north with an eye toward seizing territory from the Zetas, who had long controlled Veracruz’s valuable routes for smuggling drugs, migrants and contraband.

The “Zeta killers” burst on to the scene shortly before President Felipe Calderon deployed fresh military forces into Veracruz this month.

Their sudden rise and the surgical precision with which the killers systematically picked off nearly 100 people in 17 days has led to conjecture among some people that they may be operating with implicit or direct support of the government or military. Some suggest that the June kidnapping, torture and killing of three marine cadets in Veracruz might have propelled the marine corps to begin acting outside the law. Officials dismiss such speculation, and others wonder why a group aspiring to be a clandestine death squad would post videos on YouTube.

Indeed, some point to Guzman’s Sinaloa network, and say the military look to the killings may be an attempt to deflect attention.

If that’s true, the Zeta killers would simply be the latest of the many cartel-affiliated paramilitary gangs that have been fighting in Mexico since the beginning of the offensive that Calderon launched against the cartels at the start of his administration nearly five years ago.

The Zetas themselves started as the private military arm of the Gulf cartel, hired gunmen recruited from army elite forces to fight and kill the cartel’s enemies. They evolved into a full-fledged trafficking cartel after splitting violently from their former patrons.

Vigilante gangs purporting to be defending society and working with some level of official complicity have frequently acted in Mexico in recent years. La Familia in Michoacan, which surged in Calderon’s southwestern home state in 2005, claimed that it was protecting residents from the Zetas.

In 2009, Mauricio Fernandez, mayor of the affluent city of San Pedro Garza Garcia near the northern industrial hub of Monterrey, announced the formation of “intelligence squads” to “cleanse” his jurisdiction of criminals. One particularly notorious thug turned up dead in short order.

More than 40,000 people have been killed in the expanding drug war since December 2006, when it began, according to government intelligence figures.

The government of Veracruz has sought to minimize the horror the state is living, or cast it as part of a broader national phenomenon for which local officials are not responsible.

Yet state officials have only exacerbated the uncertainty and suspicion by hiding information on new fatalities and claiming with excessive haste that most of the first batch of 35 dead were criminals. In fact, neither Gov. Javier Duarte nor state Atty. Gen. Reynaldo Escobar, who made those claims, had that information. The city’s top newspaper, Notiver, later reported that the majority did not have criminal records. Escobar has since been forced to resign.

“Where is the government? What is happening here? What is it all about?”