American teenager invents method to detect pancreatic cancer

Teen invents method to detect pancreatic cancer

Andraka, Maryland, was awarded a prize of $ 75.000 to create this method of detecting cancerous.

Teen invents method to detect pancreatic cancer

Teen invents method to detect pancreatic cancer

An American teenager, Jack Andraka, 15 years old invented a new method, simple and inexpensive to detect incipient pancreatic cancer. Special Photo

Washington, United States. – An American teenager of 15 years, Jack Andraka, invented a new form, simple and inexpensive to detect incipient pancreatic cancer, reported CNN.

The discovery earned him first prize at science fair and engineering the world’s largest, the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair.

Andraka, from Maryland, was awarded a $ 75,000 prize for creating this detection method carcinogen “using  blood and urine tests.” The test has shown a 90% more accurate than those used so far, is 28 times cheaper and a thousand times more sensitive than current tests for this cancer. “I’m working with Johns Hopkins to improve the patent and I am also beginning to offer the product to other companies “to market, said the young inventor.

Andraka explained that detect pancreatic cancer early increases the chance of cure to almost one hundred percent. to the advantages of his method adds the which is not invasive to the body.

The pancreas is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. Risk factors include smoking, obesity, high consumption of red meat, high consumption of sugar, a diet low in fiber and diabetes mellitus. Each year 44.000 Americans are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.

MEXICO CITY a new medical technique in heart surgery in just three hours

Patients who cannot have open-heart surgery have another option with the aortic valve implantation for the first time in Mexico

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The aortic valve obstruction in the heart of Anne was resolved in just three hours without practice an aggressive surgical intervention.

The new valve mounted on a mesh-like spring of a pen was placed using the technique known as catheterization through a small incision in the groin which was introduced into the heart.

This cure is for calcific aortic stenosis for those who suffered and are put at a high risk of developing heart failure because the disease hampers blood flow to the heart.

The device and where you put the valve has added a “ball” that reaches out to destroy the damaged valve and implant the new one is fixed in the myocardium.

The innovative technique of trans-catheter aortic valve implantation was performed for the first time in Mexico, in the XXI Century National Medical Center of the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS) on 8 May. Ana, 69, today it is home.

The novelty is that thanks to the material called nitinol, which has the peculiarity that when subjected to cold contracts, it is now possible to introduce this mesh with the valve to the catheter and take it to heart.

“Heart surgery from 50 to 60 begins to develop and begin to have ideas increasingly invade the body, the problem is that there were materials that could enter through tiny catheters, as is the case the prosthesis or device that travels with the valve, which measures less than nine millimeters, “said Dr. Victor Manuel Lozano, head of the Division of Surgical and diagnostic procedures at the Hospital of Cardiology XXI Century.

This procedure is an alternative for patients who are not candidates for open heart surgery because of age or suffering from diseases such as diabetes, hypertension or kidney problems.

“This valve is indicated for patients who once were inoperable, terminally ill patients who were given only medical treatment was so high because the possibility of dying in surgery we decided not to operate,” he said.

With this technique no more than a decade and there is no need to transfuse patients, or with special catheters multiinvadirlos, which commonly occurs in a conventional operation. Recovery time can be three days, whereas before it was up to three months.

According to Dr. Moises Calderon Abbo, director of the Hospital of Cardiology XXI Century, the world will have about six thousand valves of this type, two thousand 500 in Latin America and two in our country, both on 8 May.

“Anne came to the doctor before being in heart failure, the procedure is relatively low risk, is a small incision in the groin with an awake patient, the valve is placed and if all is well at two, three days you can go home and you leave with a heart healed, because the valve was uncovered, and automatically starts to improve oxygenation and reduces the blood pressure, “explained Calderon, who explained that in addition to do it via the femoral implant can be placed through the axillary artery or the tip of the heart.

In the XXI Century National Medical Center are treated each year about 400 patients for aortic stenosis. Of these, between 10 and 15% are inoperable patients who would be candidates for intervenirlos with this technique.

Mexico City- Girl Genius does primary, secondary and high school in four years

At 10 years, Daphne Almazan starts College tomorrow and can overcome even fictional stories such as Doggie Howser, the doctor of 14 years

In less than four years, Daphne Anaya Almazan completed primary, secondary and high school. She is 10 years, and tomorrow will debut as college.

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As if to demonstrate that the brightness is inherited in the genes, intelligence runs in the family. This girl genius is the sister of Andrew, who at 16 became the youngest psychologist in the country.

To keep pace, she was 13 years old, or perhaps earlier, is the youngest graduate of Mexico, breaking all records of her brother and beating even the fictional stories carried Doggie Howser television as, who was a doctor at age 14.

“We are proud that a girl can achieve this goal, and will go to college two years before me!” Boasts Andrew, the young genius, who within a year, at the age of 18, also will be a medical Psychologist .

Daphne psychology classes will begin in the Monterrey Institute of Technology, under a plan semi-face this week. Today he will hold a high school graduation party, along with Delanie, sister of 14 years, another child prodigy who preferred to stay away from the cameras and microphones.

Want to be an example and model

The youngest of Anaya Almazan, however, wants to know, that she should be the history of each gifted child.

“I want that many children to repeat what I’m doing, they can go to college at age 10 or even younger ages, that is my biggest dream,” Daphne longs for.

Unlike her, most of the whiz kids in this country have to deal with erroneous diagnosis of ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) or unfairly bear the label of unruly, as happened to Andrew.

Fortunately with Daphne, her parents and her brothers had already walked the path. “We had the full knowledge that he had no pathology or any behavioral deviation, it was like just three percent of the population learns faster,” explains his father Hasdrubal Almazan.

Little Daphne showed signs of higher intelligence before the age of three years when, alone, she learned to read and write.

Knowing virtually all the contents of basic education, primary and secondary was less than two years and eight months, when usually a girl would be in third grade, she had gone through high school In a year and 11 months later, she finished.

“It feels pretty good because I love learning, and now my next goal is to finish a degree in psychology, but I also want to go further right and nanotechnology from different areas to help humanity,” says Convencidísima.

“I’m very happy because I do what I want and what I like and hopefully all will go well,” he says with a smile, almost permanent, that breaks that stereotype of genius, as a bookworm.

A big girl

Maturity of being big hits people over and over again with her intense spirit of being a girl, palpable, for example, in the pretty white ribbon worn on the head to decorate her hair.

“The real Daphne would be right now with broken screens. She is very playful and very naughty that gets her into trouble because all the time she is moving and suddenly breaks things, “says the mother of this family full of brilliant minds, Dunia Anaya.

“It makes sense to keep playing because she is still a very young girl and the fact that going to college does not mean you have to skip a stage,” added her father.

Daphne talks all the time, bored with routine things, but also a good listener, she is the most enthusiastic person at home. So much so, that every time a birthday is coming up she is responsible for putting up posters in cupboards, doors and windows to announce the celebration. At the end of the day, she is just a girl.

Facts about Cocaine use in the United States

Brasília - If you don't have a pipe, do it wit...

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Cocaine use in the United States has an extremely broad range of characteristics. Cocaine hydrochloride was historically used for medicinal purposes. However, in the early 20th century and again in the 1970s through the 1980s it regained broad popularity for recreational use.

 The Country Profile (CP) notes that current use is largely non-medicinal, mostly in the form of cocaine hydrochloride [powder] and smokable [crack] cocaine. Hydrochloride is generally inhaled or injected. Cocaine can be smoked as crack, or hydrochloride may be mixed with tobacco or marijuana. An estimated 90% of US users inhale hydrochloride and approximately one-third smoke it.

Surveys reviewed in the CP indicate that use rose drastically in the 1970s and peaked in the middle 1980s. Use has continued to decline. The number of “occasional cocaine users” for the raid to late 1980s totaled 5.9 million and [monthly users] numbered about 2.9 minion. Users in 1992 comprised approximately 3.4 million “occasional” and 1.1 million “monthly” users. However, the total number of “frequent users” remained stable at 650 000 between 1988 and 1992. Use predominates in impoverished inner city neighbor-hoods among people between the ages of 15 and 34. Similar patterns appear for all ethnic groups although male users outnumber female users. Use declined by 63% for adolescents.

The profile reports that cocaine availability has increased and prices have substantially decreased over the last two decades. Reports indicate that high quality cocaine is now available at a lower cost than during peak use in 1985.

Consequences of Cocaine Use

 The US CP reports several areas of impact on user health. Major negative effects among heavy and chronic users were higher suicide rates, heart and lung problems and difficulty with concentration and memory. Increased sexual stimulation and sexual dysfunction were identified but research in this area is limited. The CP points out complications, caused by cocaine use during pregnancy has been exaggerated by the media. Research generally fails to support cocaine as the source of prenatal problems relative to other social factors such as poverty or poor prenatal care.

One consequence of use cited was a dramatic increase in emergency room and private physician referrals for cocaine-related health problems. This was most notable in major metropolitan areas. Most emergency room admissions were for “detoxification, unexpected drug reactions and chronic negative health effects.” Of note, 44 times the number of cocaine-related deaths occurred in 1989 (2332 reported cases) in comparison to 1975 (53 reported cases).

A social consequence reported in the CP is the connection between crime and cocaine use. It notes that two-thirds of all females and one-half of all males arrested test positive for cocaine. Increased criminal activity was noted for males with heavy use of cocaine. Crack users may also experience more violent or psychotic events.

One of the most significant health consequences posed by cocaine use is its association with increased risk for transmission of HIV/AIDS. Of concern is needle sharing among cocaine and polydrug injectors and an enhanced potential for unsafe sex, fostered by the disinhibiting effects of cocaine and by cases where sex is offered in exchange for cocaine. Harm reduction strategies, particularly needle exchanges, condom distribution and prevention campaigns, are essential to stem HIV spread through all cocaine-using populations. Cocaine use in the United States has an extremely broad range of characteristics. Cocaine hydrochloride was historically used for medicinal purposes. However, in the early 20th century and again in the 1970s through the 1980s it regained broad popularity for recreational use.

The CP notes that current use is largely non-medicinal, mostly in the form of cocaine hydrochloride “powder” and smokable “crack” cocaine. Hydrochloride is generally inhaled intranasally or injected. Smokable cocaine can be smoked as crack, or hydrochloride may be mixed with tobacco or marijuana. An estimated 90% of US users inhale hydrochloride and approximately one-third smoke it.

Surveys reviewed in the CP indicate that use rose drastically in the 1970s and peaked in the middle 1980s. Use has continued to decline. The number of “occasional cocaine users” for the raid to late 1980s totalled 5.9 million and “monthly users” numbered about 2.9 minion. Users in 1992 comprised approximately 3.4 million “occasional” and 1.1 million “monthly” users. However, the total number of “frequent users” remained stable at 650 000 between 1988 and 1992. Use predominates in impoverished inner city neighbourhoods among people between the ages of 15 and 34. Similar patterns appear for all ethnic groups although male users outnumber female users. Use declined by 63% for adolescents.

The profile reports that cocaine availability has increased and prices have substantially decreased over the last two decades. Reports indicate that high quality cocaine is now available at a lower cost than during peak use in 1985.

Responses

The CP identifies more than two million “hard-core” cocaine users in the United States. This was described as problematic since there are no standard treatment programmes for cocaine dependence. It was emphasized that intranasal users had more favourable treatment outcomes than do crack smokers. Also, females were found to demonstrate a better response to treatment than do males. Multiple drug use was common. Alcohol is the major drug used with cocaine.

The primary media responses mentioned in the profile focus on the “war on drugs” that centred on crack. However, the media offers negative, exaggerated and often racialized images of crack users. This is especially apparent for women, who are frequently portrayed as prostitutes and unfit mothers. The CP contends that media prevention campaigns are founded on stereotype and myth.

The primary political response noted in the CP is the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988 which financed several programmes including research on development of medications for treatment of cocaine dependence.